Mind that Abides

Mind that Abides. Panpsychism in the new millennium

Edited by David Skrbina. University of Michigan at Dearborn
Advances in Consciousness Research, 75
Benjamins Publishing Company.
2009. xiv, 401 pp. John.

Panpsychism is the view that all things, living and nonliving, possess some mind like quality. It stands in sharp contrast to the traditional notion of mind as the property of humans and (perhaps) a few select ‘higher animals’. Though surprising at first glance, panpsychism has a long and noble history in both Western and Eastern thought. Overlooked by analytical, materialist philosophy for most of the 20th century, it is now experiencing a renaissance of sorts in several areas of inquiry. A number of recent books – including Skrbina’s Panpsychism in the West (2005) and Strawson et al’s Consciousness and its Place in Nature (2006) – have established panpsychism as respectable and viable. Mind That Abides builds on these works. It takes panpsychism to be a plausible theory of mind and then moves forward to work out the philosophical, psychological and ethical implications. With 17 contributors from a variety of fields, this book promises to mark a wholesale change in our philosophical outlook.

 Table of contents

Contributors
vii–viii
Acknowledgements & dedication
ix
Introduction
xi–xiv
1. Panpsychism in history: An overview
David Skrbina
1–29
Part I. Analysis and science
31
2. Realistic monism: Why physicalism entails panpsychism, and on the Sesmet theory of subjectivity

Galen Strawson
33–65
3. Halting the descent into panpsychism: A quantum thermofield theoretical perspective

Gordon G. Globus
67–82
4. Mind under matter

Sam Coleman
83–107
5. The conscious connection: A psycho-physical bridge between brain and pan-experiential quantum geometry

Stuart R. Hameroff and Jon Powell
109–127
6. Can the panpsychist get around the combination problem?

Phil Goff
129–135
7. Universal correlates of consciousness

Stephen Deiss
137–158
8. Panpsychism, the Big-Bang-Argument, and the dignity of life

Patrick Spät
159–176
Part II. Process philosophy
177
9. Back to Whitehead? Galen Strawson and the rediscovery of panpsychism

Pierfrancesco Basile
179–199
10. Does process externalism support panpsychism? The relational nature of the physical world as a foundation for the conscious mind

Riccardo Manzotti
201–220
11. The dynamics of possession: An introduction to the sociology of Gabriel Tarde

Didier Debaise
221–230
12. Finite eventism

Carey R. Carlson
231–250
Part III. Metaphysics and mind
251
13. Zero-person and the psyche

Graham Harman
253–282
14. “All things think:” Panpsychism and the metaphysics of nature

Iain Hamilton Grant
283–299
15. ‘Something there?’ James and Fechner meet in a Pluralistic Universe

Katrin Solhdju
301–313
16. Panpsychic presuppositions of Samkhya metaphysics

Jaison A. Manjaly
315–323
17. The awareness of rock: East-Asian understandings and implications

Graham Parkes
325–340
18. Why has the West failed to embrace panpsychism?

Freya Mathews
341–360
19. Minds, objects, and relations: Toward a dual-aspect ontology

David Skrbina
361–382
References
383–397
Index
399–401

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